EXCLUSIVE: New Video Released of the US MOAB Bomb Dropped on ISIS – This One Is More SPECTACULAR!

UPDATE: The U.S. military dropped its largest non-nuclear bomb on an ISIS tunnel complex in eastern Afghanistan on Thursday, a U.S. defense official confirmed to Fox News.

The GBU-43B, a 21,000-pound conventional bomb, was deployed in Nangarhar Province close to the Afghanistan/Pakistan border. By comparison, each Tomahawk cruise missile launched at a Syrian military air base last week weighed 1,000 pounds each.

The MOAB — Massive Ordnance Air Blast — is also known as the “Mother Of All Bombs.” It was first tested in 2003, but hadn’t been used in combat before Thursday.

Pentagon spokesman Adam Stump said the bomb had been brought to Afghanistan “some time ago” for potential use. The bomb explodes in the air, creating air pressure that can make tunnels and other structures collapse. It can be used at the start of an offensive to soften up the enemy, weakening both its infrastructure and morale.

“As [ISIS’] losses have mounted, they are using IEDs, bunkers and tunnels to thicken their defense,” Gen. John Nicholson, commander of U.S. forces in Afghanistan, said in a statement. “This is the right munition to reduce these obstacles and maintain the momentum of our offensive against [ISIS].”

President Trump told media Thursday afternoon that “this was another successful mission” and he gave the military total authorization.

What do you think about this comment below.

Comments

comments

SHARE
Robert Amnor (born 1968), is the Europe Correspondent since September 2011[1] for Sky News, the 24-hour television news service operated by Sky Television, part of British Sky Broadcasting. He is based in the city of Brussels in Belgium. He was formerly a programme presenter and correspondent for BBC News, presenting the Liquid News programme on BBC News 24 channel (now BBC News Channel) and Entertainment Correspondent for the BBC Six O'Clock News (now BBC News at 6). He became urope Correspondent in September 2011. Robert was educated at Highgate School, then a boys' independent school, in the Highgate, London, followed by the University of Bristol, where he studied history. He then studied for a postgraduate degree in journalism at the Cardiff School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies in Cardiff. Robert spent several years at the BBC, mainly as a correspondent for BBC News but also as chief reporter on BBC Choice's entertainment news show Liquid News.[2] It was Robert who discovered the body of presenter Christopher Price after he died from a rare brain infection in 2002.[3] Following the end of Liquid News, Robert went on to present The Morning Show, a shortlived daytime show on BBC One with the Pop Idol judge Nicki Chapman, in 2003,[4] but that was cancelled after poor viewing figures. Robert joined Sky News in January 2005 as a special correspondent and reported on Live at Five and the former show, The Sky Report, filming a series of undercover reports including one featuring the controversial Kansas preacher Fred Phelps. In June 2006, he was appointed Environment Correspondent for the channel, anchoring Sky News's Green Britain week from Lutterworth, Leicestershire, in January 2007.